Archive

Posts Tagged ‘exercise’

Strong & Steady


Orthopedic surgeon offers new life to injured knees and ankles with advanced technology

Brace yourself. That’s something we might say to ourselves—or someone we care about—to help face a bump in the road with strength and resilience.

When that hard knock is a knee or ankle injury, orthopedic surgeon Roddy McGee, DO, is offering his patients a super-strong internal brace. This innovative technique helps people bounce back quicker—and with less discomfort—from injuries.

Dr. McGee uses this internal bracing technique to repair common sports related mishaps, including ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) injuries in knees, Achilles tendon ruptures in ankles, and elbow injuries.

With this internal bracing technique, surgeons can use smaller incisions, so there’s less pain and swelling. “The faster recovery times mean you can return to an active life quicker,” Dr. McGee says. “The internal brace is a super-strong suture material that repairs the injury, provides temporary stability during healing, and is anchored into the bone. The plastic anchor eventually dissolves.”

From tattered and torn to strong and steady. If you’re a sports fan, you know that many knee injuries involve the ACL, the smallest of the four main ligaments in the knee. It is the main stabilizing ligament in the center of the knee. It keeps your shinbone (tibia) from sliding forward and rotating on your thighbone (femur).

Treatment for ACL injuries is typically reconstruction, often using tendons from other places in the body. By using the internal brace technique, surgeons can offer additional strength and support to the reconstructed ligament. It stabilizes the ligament, helping it heal at an appropriate length. It accelerates recovery—allowing people to walk more naturally and return to their activities sooner.

‘I knew what happened immediately’

Your Achilles tendon is the largest tendon in your body, connecting your calf muscle to your heel bone. You need it for walking, running, and jumping. It’s strong, but it can still be vulnerable to painful injuries in both professional and recreational athletes.

Just ask Casey Craven. In February 2017, Casey was trying out for a regional level of American Ninja Warrior when his Achilles gave out in a painful and dramatic way.

“I was on the last obstacle, the 18-foot warped wall, when it popped. I knew what happened immediately,” Casey says. “It was an intense pain that felt like someone hit me in the back of the calf with a baseball bat.”

Dr. McGee repaired Casey’s Achilles with the internal brace technique. As with ACL repairs, internal bracing offers added stability—through a single small incision. Several sets of strong sutures tie together the ends of the tendon. This internal infrastructure braces the tendon during healing. Again, the result is less pain and a speedier recovery.

“Previous repair techniques would require the patient to be in a cast for six months,” Dr. McGee says. With the internal brace technique, patients typically recover much more quickly, he says.

Casey wore a boot for four weeks before he went back to his job as an operating room technician—and to his athletic pursuits, as well. He hasn’t had a problem since, even doing strenuous workouts, he says.

One coach’s game plan: Get it done!

A kinder and custom approach to knee replacement

Sam Thomas, baseball coach at Las Vegas High School, knows how important having the right equipment is to sports success. For him, that includes two custom knee implants.

When Sam first considered knee replacement at the age of 52 to relieve the pain of  osteoarthritis, he thought maybe he was too young. He’d heard he should wait until he was at least 55.

But advances in total knee replacement convinced him otherwise, and today he’s really happy with his custom implants. He got his right knee replaced in June 2015—and then his left in August 2017.

A perfect fit

In the past, orthopedic surgeons had to rely on “off-the-shelf” knee implants from a range of standard sizes, says Roddy McGee, DO. That required surgeons to adjust the bones in the joint to fit the implant. Today, Dr. McGee uses implants that are customized specifically for the patient—the ConforMIS customized knee implant.

How does it work? A CT scan of the patient’s knee is converted to a 3-D model. It’s used to design an implant to match the knee precisely. The custom fit follows the shape and contour of each patient’s knee—so the bone doesn’t have to be altered as much to make it fit. After surgery, these custom knees feel more natural and cause less pain than standard implants.

Sam’s advice? “Don’t wait—get it done,” he says. “Less bone is being removed, so even if I do have to have a knee replacement again sometime in the future, I’d feel very comfortable doing it. In fact, the second replacement actually felt better quicker than the first.”

Move forward with confidence. Find an orthopedic surgeon who does custom knee replacements at St. Rose Dominican by calling 702.616.4900.

Advertisements

Get Heart Healthy – One Day at A Time

The human heart is complex. Keeping yours healthy doesn’t have to be! “Making simple changes each day can help keep your heart healthy and strong,” says Andrew M. Ayers, MD, MBA, a licensed interventional cardiologist who practices at Dignity Health–St. Rose Dominican.

Where should you start? Dr. Ayers suggests focusing on small, everyday choices that can help you improve your diet, pump up your exercise routine, manage your weight, and relieve stress.

Where to begin? Try following this day-by-day plan for a heart-healthy week. These doable steps can inspire you to keep up the momentum and keep your heart healthy!

Monday

Go meatless. You’ll reduce your overall saturated fat intake, which can help prevent heart attacks and other problems. Look to beans, lentils, tofu, or unsalted nuts to replace meat in your favorite dishes.

Tuesday

Say “so long” to sugary beverages. They’re high in calories—and often low in nutrients— which add empty calories to your diet. Quench your thirst with water or another sugar-free beverage.

Wednesday

Take 10. A 10-minute walk, that is. Even this small burst of activity can  help your heart. Walk briskly enough to increase your breathing and heart rate. Then build on your success. A good goal: Walking for at least 30 minutes a day most days of the week.

Thursday

Lighten up a little. If you’re a milk drinker, go from whole milk to low-fat—or even nonfat. You’ll get all the benefits of milk, like vitamin D and calcium, without the potentially artery clogging saturated fat.

Friday

Try something fishy. Fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids helps improve heart health. Aim for two servings of heart-healthy fish each week. (A serving is about 3. ounces.) Salmon, trout, and herring are great choices.

Saturday

Give yourself permission to relax. Set aside at least 15 minutes to just sit quietly and breathe deeply. Imagine your stress seeping away. Finding healthy ways to manage stress can help keep your blood pressure in check.

Sunday

Draw up next week’s plan. What new healthy habits can you work into your life?

For more inspiration, visit StRoseReach.org. We’ve got heart-smart articles, recipes, health tools, and more.

 

Young athletes: Cheer them on to safety

February 3, 2017 Leave a comment

Every kid is a winner when it comes to playing sports. Game time can boost a youngster’s social skills and selfconfidence, while providing plenty of healthy exercise that’s also a lot of fun.

But every sport poses at least some risks. As a parent, you can work with coaches and your young athlete to help reduce these risks.

Stay off the injured list. To help your child score in safety, Emily Peterson, DO, FAAP, a pediatrician at Dignity Health Medical Group’s Henderson location, suggests the following:

ASK QUESTIONS. Learn what your child’s sports program is doing to prevent and respond to injuries, such as ensuring conditioning for players and safety training for coaches.

SCHEDULE A PHYSICAL. A preseason exam from a doctor will help confirm that your youngster is healthy enough to play.

GET EQUIPPED. Depending on the sport, a helmet, body padding, mouthguards or shinguards, eye protection, and proper shoes may be needed.

PLAY BY THE RULES. From football to soccer, many sports have rules designed to prevent injuries. Make sure your child knows—and follows—them.

BEAT THE HEAT. Give your child a water bottle—and encourage frequent drinking.

WARM UP. Encourage warm-up exercises before and cooldown exercises after both practices and games.

TAKE CONCUSSIONS SERIOUSLY. In general, players shouldn’t get back in the game until medically evaluated and cleared to play.

ENCOURAGE REST. Athletes need breaks in between seasons and during practices and games.

SPEAK UP. Teach your child to speak up if he or she is sick or hurt. And remember to check with your child’s doctor if you suspect an injury.

Sources: American Academy of Pediatrics; National Institutes of Health; Safe Kids Worldwide

Childhood Obesity Leads to Weighty Health Issues

October 26, 2010 Leave a comment

St. Rose Wound Healing & Hyperbaric Medicine Center Offers Tips for a Healthy Halloween

Halloween can be a particularly scary time for parents who want to help children lose or maintain their weight. The St. Rose Dominican Hospitals Wound Healing & Hyperbaric Medicine Centers, National Healing Wound Healing Centers, offers these tips:

  • Be sure children eat dinner before trick or treating to minimize late night snacking.
  • Break up the candy they receive into smaller amounts to be enjoyed over a period of time.
  • Mix candy corn and M&M’s into a healthy trail mix that offers more nutrition and less candy per serving.
  • Search the Internet and family magazines for healthy treats. Deviled eggs can easily become monster eyes and Halloween cookie cutters turn sandwiches and cheese slices into frighteningly fun food.
  • Give out stickers, sugar free gum, pretzels or low calorie snack packs, party favors or other treats so you don’t risk having left over candy in the house.
  • Shift the focus away from food by carving a pumpkin, making costumes or taking in a local autumn fair.
  • Physical activity is an important part of weight loss. Take a walk with your children to find fall leaves, go horseback riding like the Headless Horseman or take a bike ride through the neighborhood to choose the house you would want to haunt if you were a ghost.
  • It is important not to use food as a reward or punishment so let children enjoy Halloween but help them make healthy choices that won’t haunt them for years to come.

In the past two decades, the number of our nation’s children who are overweight has doubled according to records kept by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). That’s hardly surprising given that adolescents spend more time in front of computer monitors, television and video screens than ever before.

While overweight children often face teasing, the emotional toll can be accompanied by physical illness such as sleep apnea, which disrupts sleep, asthma, liver disease and orthopedic problems.

“In addition to health issues they experience as children, extra weight can also lead to conditions they will need to manage for the rest of their life,” said Katherine J. Rowland, chief clinical officer for National Healing Corporation, which partners with hospitals around the nation to treat chronic wounds often related to the affects of diabetes and vascular disease. “Many obese children have high cholesterol and blood pressure levels. There has even been an alarming increase of children with type 2 diabetes, which is usually classified as adult on-set diabetes.”

In a call to action to prevent childhood obesity, the Office of the Surgeon General noted that overweight adolescents have a 70 percent chance of becoming overweight or obese adults.

The report suggested parents concerned with their children’s weight should consult their doctors and other healthcare professionals who can help rule out rare medical problems which might cause unhealthy weight and assess if a child’s weight is unhealthy.

When helping children lose pounds, most experts agree that parents should concentrate on small changes that can gradually become lifetime habits.  As a leader in wound healing and disease management, St. Rose Dominican Hospitals’ Wound Healing & Hyperbaric Medicine Centers are located at the Rose de Lima (702.616.4870) and San Martín (702.492.8281) Campuses.

%d bloggers like this: